Good Intentions, Bad Results

In The Logic of Failure, Dietrich Dörner makes the following observation:

In our political environment, it would seem, we are surrounded on all sides with good intentions. But the nurturing of good intentions is an utterly undemanding mental exercise, while drafting plans to realize those worthy goals is another matter. Moreover, it is far from clear whether “good intentions plus stupidity” or “evil intentions plus intelligence” have wrought more harm in the world. People with good intentions usually have few qualms about pursuing their goals. As a result, incompetence that would otherwise have remained harmless often becomes dangerous, especially as incompetent people with good intentions rarely suffer the qualms of conscience that sometimes inhibit the doings of competent people with bad intentions. The conviction that our intentions are unquestionably good may sanctify the most questionable means. (emphasis added, Kindle location 133)

That sounds about right. To this I would add that incompetent people with good intentions rarely suffer the consequences of imposing their good intentions on others.

The distinguishing feature of a competent good intentioned individual and an incompetent good intentioned individual is the ability to predict and understand the consequences of their actions. Not just the immediate consequences, but the long term consequences as well. The really competent good intentioned individuals will also have a grasp of the systemic effects of acting on their intentions. The result is such individuals are deliberate in their actions and less likely to act or react emotionally to circumstances. And this, of course, is a source of great irritation for the Occupied With Self rabble.

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