Archive for the ‘government’ Category

“Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow.”

So states Linus’s Law. Coined by Eric Raymond in his book “The Cathedral and the Bazaar:” Given a large enough beta-tester and co-developer base, almost every problem will be characterized quickly and the fix obvious to someone. Or, less formally, “Given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow.” I dub this: “Linus’s Law”. My original formulation […]

Old Romance: Horse Carriage Rides. New Romance: Electric Vehicles

NYC’s new mayor to replace Central Park horse carriages with EVs Because romantic horse drawn open air carriage rides through Central Park are EXACTLY what has kept me from visiting New York City. The prospect of enjoying the city from the cramped confines of an EV that smells vaguely like vomit certainly changes the incentive! […]

Experts in a Time of Unreason – Update

In a previous post, Experts in a Time of Unreason, I made reference to a case involving six scientists and a government official convicted of manslaughter for the failure to predict the 2009 earthquake that killed more than 300 people and leveled the city of L’Aquila. A year later, one of the convicted scientists, Enzo […]

Culture Saved

Sen. Daniel Moynihan (D-NY): In some forty years of government work I have learned one thing for certain. As I have put it, the central conservative truth is that it is culture, not politics, that determines the success of a society. The central liberal truth is that politics can change a culture and save it […]

Incompatable Beliefs

An article on the Home School Legal Defense Association web site reports the following: Professor Martha Albertson Fineman, from the Emory University School of Law, wrote in 2009 of her fear of parents with “oppressive, hierarchical belief systems.” She says, Indeed, the long-term consequences for the child being home schooled or sent to a private […]

Law Abiding Citizens Have Nothing to Fear

So says William Hague, England’s Foreign Secretary. “Only terrorists, criminals and spies should fear secret activities of the British and US intelligence agencies.” I appreciate the challenge of collecting accurate intelligence and connecting the dots. It’s the 21st century and the bad guys no longer hang out in shadowed doorways and use dumpsters as drop […]

Lessons from Katrina on the Hudson and Reynolds’ Second Law

Previously, I wrote how the government’s poor response to hurricane Sandy is a manifestation of decades worth of mission creep: Micromanagement of the citizenry, on the other hand, is something that should unequivocally be outside the control or influence of governments, if for no other reason than it detracts from the organization’s ability to successfully […]

Clean Energy Not So Clean

Sting operations reveal Mafia involvement in renewable energy What does it say about your industry when the Mafia gets involved? That it’s above board, corruption-free, and legitimate? Related PostsThere’s a Global Strategic Maple Syrup Reserve? Generous Threats – Aussie Style Instapundit slips. Armageddon nigh.

Experts in a Time of Unreason

Sarah Hoyt has an interesting essay on her experience of becoming a United States citizen. This comment caught my eye: Part of the thing with Europe is the worship of the “experts.”  “We’ll take it to the expert” or “We’ll have the expert do it.” Yet, when the experts get it wrong, even when the […]

Lessons from Katrina on the Hudson

There are many. The most valuable one for survivors and observers may be that governments, even when optimally structured and run, cannot mitigate the Big Acts of Nature. The optimal structure for a government would have its power and influence limited to addressing the big things that are a consequence of large numbers of people interacting […]