Posts Tagged ‘nature’

Experts in a Time of Unreason – Update

In a previous post, Experts in a Time of Unreason, I made reference to a case involving six scientists and a government official convicted of manslaughter for the failure to predict the 2009 earthquake that killed more than 300 people and leveled the city of L’Aquila. A year later, one of the convicted scientists, Enzo […]

Time To Build An Arc

We had monsoon-like rain yesterday. According to the weather experts, 1.6 inches of rain fell in 30 minutes. That may not sound like much to many parts of the country, but it’s a lot for the desert mid-west. Checking the weather on my tablet this morning, I saw the following alert for Monday: Looks like […]

Lessons from Katrina on the Hudson and Reynolds’ Second Law

Previously, I wrote how the government’s poor response to hurricane Sandy is a manifestation of decades worth of mission creep: Micromanagement of the citizenry, on the other hand, is something that should unequivocally be outside the control or influence of governments, if for no other reason than it detracts from the organization’s ability to successfully […]

Experts in a Time of Unreason

Sarah Hoyt has an interesting essay on her experience of becoming a United States citizen. This comment caught my eye: Part of the thing with Europe is the worship of the “experts.”  “We’ll take it to the expert” or “We’ll have the expert do it.” Yet, when the experts get it wrong, even when the […]

Lessons from Katrina on the Hudson

There are many. The most valuable one for survivors and observers may be that governments, even when optimally structured and run, cannot mitigate the Big Acts of Nature. The optimal structure for a government would have its power and influence limited to addressing the big things that are a consequence of large numbers of people interacting […]

Mountain Lion

While on the way back from an extended bike ride up to dinosaur ridge, my wife and I were shouted a warning from a man in a minivan parked on the opposite side to Rooney Road. “Mountain Lion!”, he shouted, pointing to a tree we were just about to pass. We stopped and crossed over […]

Winds of Change

I’ve written about Lovelock’s less than scientific handling of “climate change” in the past. Looks like he’s had a change of perspective: James Lovelock, the maverick scientist who became a guru to the environmental movement with his “Gaia” theory of the Earth as a single organism, has admitted to being “alarmist” about climate change and […]

Extinction: Something to Avoid

I can get on board with this. After all, what kind of example will we be setting for our children if we’re so irresponsible as to let ourselves go extinct? Or worse, as Neil deGrasse Tyson points out, think of the hit to the self esteem of our dead selves if we let the planet get […]

First Robin -2012

Unless winter is particularly hard, robins tend to stay around here most of the year. But it’s when they start singing that I know spring is on they way. Heard this guy belting out a fabulous tune this morning as I sat down to the first cup of coffee of the day. Spring may be […]